The Scoop: A Publication of the University of Texas Medical School at Houston

UTHealth rolls out new brand

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston new logo

UTHealth, the new brand for The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, begins rolling out this month through the university’s online presence and printed materials.

The branding initiative is designed to increase the university’s visibility as a prominent institution in the Texas Medical Center, the state, and the nation.

“Despite the tremendous impact the university has on this community—and beyond—the community knows far too little about what we do,” said UTHealth President Larry Kaiser. “That’s the primary reason we began a branding initiative. We have taken a big step by creating a brand as strong as this university—a brand image and a promise that tell the community who we are and what we achieve.”

Kaiser said that while the new logo and d/b/a (doing business as) name—UTHealth—are important, the heart of the branding initiative is the promise:

“Because we are many diverse components woven into one university, the exceptional people of UTHealth deliver innovative solutions that create the best hope for a healthier future.”

Michelle Morris, assistant vice president for marketing and communications, noted that the new logo features a tapestry symbol that represents the strength derived from UTHealth’s six schools working together to tackle complex health challenges. UTHealth, the most comprehensive academic health center in the UT System and the U.S. Gulf Coast region, includes schools of biomedical informatics, biomedical sciences, dentistry, medicine, nursing, and public health, plus a psychiatric hospital, multiple institutes and centers, a growing network of clinics, and outreach programs in education and care throughout the region.

“We are collaborating across the university and with other institutions in the country and abroad to improve human health,” Kaiser said. “As the nation looks to reform the way we provide health care, we are leading the way in a number of areas.”

Business cards, letterhead, envelopes, mailing labels, hang tags, note cards, pocket cards, and pocket folders with the brand's new logo may now be ordered online from UT Printing and Media Services.

Medical School-branded PowerPoint templates for presentations and research presentations are available for download via the Office of Communications website.

E-mail signatures and graphic and editorial guidelines may be found on the Graphic and Editorial Standards of the intranet.

To obtain a Medical School or UTHealth logo, e-mail Darla Brown. Extra posters and handouts for those who did not receive one at the brand rollout meeting are available in the Dean’s Office.

— Meredith Raine, Office of Institutional Advancement, Media Relations

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Center for Healthy Aging hosts open house Sept. 21

UT Physicians logo

The UT Center for Healthy Aging will host an open house 3–6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 21, at its Bellaire location, 6700 West Loop South, Suite 130.

Dedicated to the well-being of older adults, the comprehensive center offers a team of specialists, including nurses, nutritionists, geriatricians, and clinicians specializing in geriatric cardiology, orthopaedics, psychiatry, urogynecology, neurology, wound care, gastroenterology, and palliative medicine.

The open house will be hosted by Dr. Carmel Dyer, Roy M. and Phyllis Gough Huffington Chair in Gerontology and director of the Center for Healthy Aging, and the Development Office of the Medical School.

For more information, contact Mary Stevenson, 713.500.3546.

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Milewicz directing new John Ritter Research Program

Dr. Dianna Milewicz

Dr. Dianna Milewicz

Actress, writer, and aortic health advocate Amy Yasbeck has joined with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Medical School to establish the John Ritter Research Program in Aortic and Vascular Diseases (JRRP) to combat the devastating disease that took the life of her husband, legendary comic actor John Ritter.

“UTHealth’s research program is at the forefront of a movement dedicated to discovering the genetic causes of aortic disease. Together, we are committed to identifying at-risk families and providing them with life-saving information,” said Yasbeck, who has just released her memoir “With Love and Laughter, John Ritter.”

Directing the new program is Dr. Dianna Milewicz, a recognized leader in aortic disease research, the President George H.W. Bush Chair in Cardiovascular Research and director of the Division of Medical Genetics.

“We are honored and excited that Amy has allowed us to establish this very important research program at UTHealth in John Ritter’s name,” said Milewicz, who has discovered four of the genes involved in causing a predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections inherited in families. “This program will bring attention to this life-threatening disease and will allow us to accelerate our research to prevent premature deaths due to aortic dissection through identifying genes that predispose to the disease. In addition, identifying the genes that cause the disease is the first step to understanding why the disease occurs and how to stop it in patients through new therapies.”

John Ritter, 54, died from an undiagnosed aortic dissection in 2003, after he experienced chest pain while taping his ABC hit comedy “8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter.” Yasbeck formed the John Ritter Foundation for Aortic Health that year. She contacted Milewicz, who encouraged Tom Ritter, John’s brother, to have his aorta scanned because of a suspected familial link. Tex Ritter, their father, also died suddenly at an early age due to an undiagnosed cardiovascular event. Tom’s aorta was already enlarged, and he had life-saving surgery in 2007.

“This tremendous collaboration with Amy Yasbeck and her foundation to establish the John Ritter Research Program allows us to further UTHealth’s mission of creating a healthier future. We are grateful to them,” said UTHealth President Larry Kaiser. “We are proud of the work of Dr. Milewicz and her team, who have taken translational research from the laboratory to the very families who need the knowledge to fight this disease.”

The JRRP will build on the collaborative research already under way in the Specialized Center for Clinically Oriented Research in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissections in the Texas Medical Center (SCCOR). The $11.6 million research program is funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and includes collaborators at Memorial Hermann Heart & Vascular Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, the Texas Heart Institute, and The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

“We will be expanding this collaborative research group to involve investigators throughout the United States and worldwide, including Europe, Japan, China, and South America,” said Milewicz, principal investigator and director of SCCOR.

Thoracic aortic disease has ranked as high as the 15th leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for nearly 15,000 deaths annually. It is caused by a defect in the wall of the aorta, the largest artery in the body, which is responsible for pumping blood out of the heart.

Through their innovative genetic discoveries, Milewicz and her team have been able to test members of families with the familial form of the disease and encourage those with the gene defect to have their aortas scanned and monitored regularly, ultimately saving lives. UTHealth now has one of the largest registries in the world with 600 families who have a genetic link to the disease.

This past spring, the Thoracic Aortic Disease Coalition, which is chaired by Milewicz and includes Yasbeck, launched a campaign to increase public awareness of aortic dissections and released “Ritter Rules,” life-saving reminders to help recognize who is at risk for aortic disease so that aortic dissection deaths can be prevented.

For more information on the JRRP or the aortic disease registry, please visit the website or call 713.500.6715.

— Deborah Mann Lake, Office of Institutional Advancement, Media Relations

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Cardinal DiNardo to speak on eugenics panel at Medical School

A panel discussion being held in conjunction with the How Healing Becomes Killing: Eugenics, Euthanasia and Extermination exhibit on display at the HAM-TMC Library will be held 3–5 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 29 in MSB 3.001. The exhibit is on loan by the Holocaust Museum Houston.

The panel will be moderated by Dr. Thomas Cole, McGovern Chair in Medical Humanities and director of The John. P. McGovern, M.D. Center for Humanities and Ethics. Participating panelists will include Rabbi Samuel Karff, Daniel Cardinal DiNardo, and Dr. Sheldon Rubenfeld.

Rabbi Karff became rabbi emeritus of Congregation Beth Israel in 1999. He is presently associate director of The John P. McGovern, M.D. Center for Humanities and Ethics and visiting professor in the Department of Family Medicine.

Cardinal DiNardo is the second and current archbishop of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, having previously served as bishop of Sioux City, Iowa from 1998 to 2004. He is the first cardinal archbishop from a diocese in the southern United States.

Rubenfeld is clinical professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, and has taught Healing by Killing: Medicine During the Third Reich for three years and Jewish Medical Ethics for seven years at Baylor. He created a six-month program on Medicine and the Holocaust at Holocaust Museum Houston, and helped in the creation of the exhibit, How Healing Becomes Killing: Eugenics, Euthanasia, Extermination, and a series of lectures by distinguished speakers: The Michael E. DeBakey Medical Ethics Lecture Series.

This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

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A new school year

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Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst was among the special guests welcoming students of UTHealth at the annual Salutation Sept. 7 at the School of Nursing.

— Dwight C. Andrews, Office of Communications, Medical School

 

 

 

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Events to Know

September 17

IMM Seminar Series: Dr. Nicholas Gaiano (Johns Hopkins) presents, “New Roles for Notch and NF-KB Signaling During Brain Development and Function.”
11 a.m., The Beth Robertson Auditorium, Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building, 1825 Pressler St.

September 20

Monday Meditations: Recharge your batteries with Dr. Alejandro Chaoul and the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics.
Noon–1 p.m., JJL 410.
No RSVP is required. Floor pillows and chairs will be provided for participants. For more information, please contact Dr. Chaoul.

Integrative Biology and Pharmacology Seminar: Dr. Jian Kuang (M. D. Anderson) presents, “The Alix Switch: Control of sorting of activated cell surface receptors into endosomes.”
4 p.m., MSB 2.135.
Reception to follow.

September 22

UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Genetic Basis for Brain Diseases seminar: Dr. Dianna Milewicz, professor of internal medicine, presents, “Moyamoya Disease and Intracranial Aneurysms: Insight into the Pathogenesis from Genetic Studies on Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.”
Noon–1 p.m., MSB 7.037.

September 23

Department of Surgery Grand Rounds: Dr. Michael Grecula, associate professor of orthopaedic surgery, presents, “Orthopedic Evaluation of the Trauma Patient.”
7 a.m., MSB 3.001.
CME credit is available.

Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Seminar Series: Dr. Sruti Debroy (postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics) presents, “Multiple posttranscriptional mechanisms control ethanolamine utilization in Enterococcus faecalis.”
4 p.m., MSB 2.103.

September 24

24th William A. Spencer, M.D., Memorial Lectureship will be presented by Dr. W. Zev Rymer (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago).
11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., MSB 3.001.

September 27

Second Annual Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Symposium.
7:30 a.m.–4:45 p.m., UT Annex Auditorium, LBJ General Hospital.
For more information, call 713.873.4686. CNE and CME credit available.

Monday Meditations: Recharge your batteries with Dr. Alejandro Chaoul and the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics.
Noon–1 p.m., JJL 410.
No RSVP is required. Floor pillows and chairs will be provided for participants. For more information, please contact Dr. Chaoul.

September 29

UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Genetic Basis for Brain Diseases seminar: Dr. Ignatia Van den Veyver (Baylor) presents, “Phenotype and Search for the Genetic Basis of Aicardi Syndrome.”
Noon–1 p.m., MSB 7.037.

Family & Community Medicine Grand Rounds: Dr. Maureen Mayes, professor of rheumatology, presents, “Evaluation of New-Onset Reynaud’s Phenomenon.”
1–2 p.m., MSB 2.135.

October 4

Monday Meditations: Recharge your batteries with Dr. Alejandro Chaoul and the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics.
Noon–1 p.m., JJL 410.
No RSVP is required. Floor pillows and chairs will be provided for participants. For more information, please contact Dr. Chaoul.

Integrative Biology and Pharmacology Seminar: Dr. Randy Hall (Emory University) presents, “Signaling by the Adhesion Receptor GPR56: Importance for Neural Stem Cell Function & Human Disease.”
4 p.m., MSB 2.135.
Reception to follow.

October 6

Clinical Research Education: An Introductory Course for Safe and Ethical Research Practice.
An introductory course for anyone involved in clinical research offering practical training in study initiation, implementation and management under GCP guidelines.
8 a.m.–4 p.m., 6410 Fannin, UT Professional Building, Suite 1100.
Registration is required.

UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Genetic Basis for Brain Diseases seminar: Dr. Sheng Zhang, IMM, presents, “In the Pursuit of the Pathogenic Mechanisms Underlying Brain Degenerative Disorders: Lessons from Huntington’s Disease.”
Noon–1 p.m., MSB 7.037.

October 7

Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Seminar Series: Dr. Jessica Tyler, Ph.D. (MD Anderson Cancer Center) presents, “Epigenetic regulation of gene expression, DNA repair, cancer and aging.”
4 p.m., MSB 2.103.

October 11

Monday Meditations: Recharge your batteries with Dr. Alejandro Chaoul and the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics.
Noon–1 p.m., JJL 410.
No RSVP is required. Floor pillows and chairs will be provided for participants. For more information, please contact Dr. Chaoul.

October 13

Clinical Research Education: An Introductory Course for Safe and Ethical Research Practice.
An introductory course for anyone involved in clinical research offering practical training in study initiation, implementation and management under GCP guidelines.
8 a.m.–4 p.m., 6410 Fannin, UT Professional Building, Suite 1100.
Registration is required.

UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Genetic Basis for Brain Diseases seminar: Dr. Jack Waymire, professor of neurobiology and anatomy, presents, “Introduction to Alzheimer’s Disease and Research.”
Noon–1 p.m., MSB 7.037.


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